publicradiointernational
pritheworld:

In many parts of Latin America, Asia and Africa, there aren’t enough doctors and nurses to care for everyone who is sick. So charities and governments have enlisted thousands of volunteers to serve as community health workers.
Today, Amy Costello investigates: Is that system fair? http://ow.ly/rUVwx 

pritheworld:

In many parts of Latin America, Asia and Africa, there aren’t enough doctors and nurses to care for everyone who is sick. So charities and governments have enlisted thousands of volunteers to serve as community health workers.

Today, Amy Costello investigates: Is that system fair? http://ow.ly/rUVwx 

In the energy debate, it’s still important to remember that whether you use “clean” energy or coal, have three cars or one, our greed causes pain. 

copyeditor
latimes:

Beyond 7 billion: After remaining stable for most of human history, the world’s population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years. The coming wave will reshape the planet, and the impact will be greatest in the poorest, most unstable countries.
This is one of the biggest projects coming out of The Times this year. Read the stories, watch the videos, look through the photos — the collection is a beast. And let us know what you think.

latimes:

Beyond 7 billion: After remaining stable for most of human history, the world’s population has exploded over the last two centuries. The boom is not over: The biggest generation in history is just entering its childbearing years. The coming wave will reshape the planet, and the impact will be greatest in the poorest, most unstable countries.

This is one of the biggest projects coming out of The Times this year. Read the stories, watch the videos, look through the photos — the collection is a beast. And let us know what you think.

theatlantic
theatlantic:

To Make America Great Again, We Need to Leave the Country

When Americans travel abroad, they are often surprised at how well other countries do the things we used to think America does best. In fact, one reason so many American businesses still lead the world is because they benchmark the competition and emulate best practices. But suggest to an American politician that we should try to learn from other countries, and he will look at you like you are from Mars. It is somehow unpatriotic even to raise such comparisons.
Imagine if a politician were to say, “France has a better health care system than we do.” I can almost guarantee that politician would suffer electoral defeat — even though the statement, in most objective respects, is true. The U.S. is, for too many, the only country that matters; experiences anywhere else are irrelevant. Remember, we have many members of Congress who boast they have no passport.
At a time when many trend lines in the U.S. point to relative decline in this regard, one actually brings hope: More and more young Americans go abroad for some of their education. 
Read more. [Image: jbachman01/Flickr]

theatlantic:

To Make America Great Again, We Need to Leave the Country

When Americans travel abroad, they are often surprised at how well other countries do the things we used to think America does best. In fact, one reason so many American businesses still lead the world is because they benchmark the competition and emulate best practices. But suggest to an American politician that we should try to learn from other countries, and he will look at you like you are from Mars. It is somehow unpatriotic even to raise such comparisons.

Imagine if a politician were to say, “France has a better health care system than we do.” I can almost guarantee that politician would suffer electoral defeat — even though the statement, in most objective respects, is true. The U.S. is, for too many, the only country that matters; experiences anywhere else are irrelevant. Remember, we have many members of Congress who boast they have no passport.

At a time when many trend lines in the U.S. point to relative decline in this regard, one actually brings hope: More and more young Americans go abroad for some of their education. 

Read more. [Image: jbachman01/Flickr]


10 Ilunga (Tshiluba, Congo): A person who is ready to forgive any abuse for the first time, to tolerate it a second time, but never a third time
11 L’esprit de l’escalier (French): usually translated as “staircase wit,” is the act of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late to deliver it
…
15 Meraki (pronounced may-rah-kee; Greek): Doing something with soul, creativity, or love. It’s when you put something of yourself into what you’re doing
16 Nunchi (Korean): the subtle art of listening and gauging another’s mood. In Western culture, nunchi could be described as the concept of emotional intelligence. Knowing what to say or do, or what not to say or do, in a given situation. A socially clumsy person can be described as ‘nunchi eoptta’, meaning “absent of nunchi”


25 Handy Words That Simply Don’t Exist In English

10 Ilunga (Tshiluba, Congo): A person who is ready to forgive any abuse for the first time, to tolerate it a second time, but never a third time

11 L’esprit de l’escalier (French): usually translated as “staircase wit,” is the act of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late to deliver it

15 Meraki (pronounced may-rah-kee; Greek): Doing something with soul, creativity, or love. It’s when you put something of yourself into what you’re doing

16 Nunchi (Korean): the subtle art of listening and gauging another’s mood. In Western culture, nunchi could be described as the concept of emotional intelligence. Knowing what to say or do, or what not to say or do, in a given situation. A socially clumsy person can be described as ‘nunchi eoptta’, meaning “absent of nunchi”


25 Handy Words That Simply Don’t Exist In English

good
good:

The planet is undergoing rapid climate change, and precious corners of the earth are being irreversibly environmentally altered. The International Ecotourism Society defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” It’s a good time to ask, how does one see the world without contributing to problems of pollution and global warming?
‘Tourist’ doesn’t have to be a dirty word.

good:

The planet is undergoing rapid climate change, and precious corners of the earth are being irreversibly environmentally altered. The International Ecotourism Society defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” It’s a good time to ask, how does one see the world without contributing to problems of pollution and global warming?

‘Tourist’ doesn’t have to be a dirty word.

The world in six cups 
"It plays a central role in both religious rituals and secular ceremonies. It has proven health benefits. It can promote either community and camaraderie or solitude and introspection. It can be calming or invigorating. Tea is arguably the most versatile beverage on Earth."
I once had a post about the world according to coffee. Well tea is a pretty good follow-up for those of us who enjoy global trekking and warm drinks.

The world in six cups

"It plays a central role in both religious rituals and secular ceremonies. It has proven health benefits. It can promote either community and camaraderie or solitude and introspection. It can be calming or invigorating. Tea is arguably the most versatile beverage on Earth."

I once had a post about the world according to coffee. Well tea is a pretty good follow-up for those of us who enjoy global trekking and warm drinks.

Miami Herald: The UN’s Worst Enemy

When it comes to Israel, the United Nations has a habit of shooting itself in the foot.

It’s about to do so again.

The General Assembly is on the brink of voting for Palestinian statehood when it convenes in mid-September. Palestinian advocates would declare victory in their legitimate quest for statehood, but the practical outcome would be a disaster. It could provoke renewed violence in Gaza and the West Bank and close the door on talks with Israel.

Diplomatically, it would elevate the Palestinian U.N. status to “state observer,” a designation held by the Vatican. But it doesn’t change facts on the ground and makes legitimate sovereignty harder to achieve. The proposal subjects the U.N. to ridicule and comes at the worst possible time for the future of the world body. Consider:

• Recently, the General Assembly had to scramble to expel Libya from membership on the Human Rights Council after the same council referred Libya to the International Criminal Court for investigation of crimes against humanity. (We did not make that up.)

• Topping that for sheer absurdity: Last June, North Korea, a flagrant arms-control violator, was named to fill the rotating presidency of the U.N. Conference on Disarmament. And in August it was succeeded by Cuba! (Still not making it up.)

• Oblivious to austerity in public budgets around the world, the agency that governs U.N. salaries granted a 3 percent cost-of-living increase in July to the 4,800 international staff members based in New York. That prompted a sharp protest from U.S. envoy Joseph Torsella, as this country contributes about $3.35 billion annually, more than any other. Failure to reverse this action, he warned, “could well lead to more draconian approaches to budget-balancing in the future.”

Such proposals are on the drawing board.

U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Miami, chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, has introduced legislation with 57 co-sponsors to alter the mandatory funding formula to a voluntary system. It calls for cutting U.S. assessments in half if total funding for the U.N.’s overall budget on a voluntary basis fails to reach 80 percent.

The congresswoman said this “will give the U.S. control over how our contributions are spent.” The legislation also cuts off contributions to any U.N. entity that upgrades the status of the Palestinian mission to the world body.

The frustration of the bill’s backers is understandable when the U.N.’s own actions contradict its stated intentions and aspirations.

Paging Ban Ki-moon!

It’s up to the secretary-general to bring the U.N. back to its senses.

A strong first step would be to set standards for agencies like the Human Rights Council to bar violators like Cuba and Zimbabwe. He must also stop the incessant drumbeat of actions against Israel on the Human Rights Council and in other U.N. agencies.

To his credit, Mr. Ban has taken the unusual step of criticizing the head of a member country, saying Syrian President Bashar Assad has lost “all sense of humanity” because of the government’s brutal efforts to stop protests. About time. And last year, Mr. Ban moved to make the U.N. more efficient by ordering a budget cutback of 3 percent to reflect the need for austerity. Now he also has to make it clear that the upcoming Palestinian vote is a non-starter for peace.

The U.N. remains indispensable. Its peacekeeping forces perform an essential task around the globe. It strives to relieve world hunger, promote gender equality and stop the spread of disease. Unfortunately, it can’t seem to resist actions that too often make the United Nations its own worst enemy.

This opinion piece from the Miami Herald is certainly worth a read. Especially now when the UN seems to be coming to a head on many important global issues. The Arab Spring, the famine crisis, and budget cuts are all putting pressure on the UN to make the right decisions and make them more quickly.