guardian
guardian:


I remain loyal to the good old cappuccino with its tried-and-tested formula of thwarted hope and dreadful disappointment. A perfect cappuccino remains the supreme coffee experience but getting one’s hands on one continues to be difficult. It has to be not too hot. The foam has to be integrated, not floating on the top like a kind of scum. This foam has to be uniform in texture, not bubbly. There must be no bubbles and there must be no chocolate on top. Most serious places do not put chocolate on the top but it is a good idea to specify “no chocolate”. If you forget to specify and it comes with chocolate, you are within your rights to send it back on the grounds that it is not a “cappuccino” but a “cappuccino with chocolate on the top”. This does not address the larger problem that a cappuccino is often not a cappuccino at all but a latte. The distinction is in danger of dissolving under the hegemony of the latte. I sometimes think I’d be better off just giving up coffee altogether. I know there are great cappuccinos to be had from stalls and vans in London but a cappuccino should come in a proper cup not a paper cup and the proper cup should be round and not too big.

G2 writers on their perfect coffee and the best ways to drink it in our special coffee issue
Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

guardian:

I remain loyal to the good old cappuccino with its tried-and-tested formula of thwarted hope and dreadful disappointment. A perfect cappuccino remains the supreme coffee experience but getting one’s hands on one continues to be difficult. It has to be not too hot. The foam has to be integrated, not floating on the top like a kind of scum. This foam has to be uniform in texture, not bubbly. There must be no bubbles and there must be no chocolate on top. Most serious places do not put chocolate on the top but it is a good idea to specify “no chocolate”. If you forget to specify and it comes with chocolate, you are within your rights to send it back on the grounds that it is not a “cappuccino” but a “cappuccino with chocolate on the top”. This does not address the larger problem that a cappuccino is often not a cappuccino at all but a latte. The distinction is in danger of dissolving under the hegemony of the latte. I sometimes think I’d be better off just giving up coffee altogether. I know there are great cappuccinos to be had from stalls and vans in London but a cappuccino should come in a proper cup not a paper cup and the proper cup should be round and not too big.

G2 writers on their perfect coffee and the best ways to drink it in our special coffee issue

Photograph: Graham Turner for the Guardian

adventureteaching-deactivated20

adventureteaching:

Quite a stat.

“Nearly one in every two buildings boasts a coffee shop, from Starbucks to local brands such as Caffe Bene and Angel-in-us Coffee. Despite the existence of shops a mere 70 meters (yards) apart, it can still be hard to find a seat on some evenings even though a cup can cost more than a meal.”

I never thought I would say anything about coffee was problematic. Interestingly enough, though, it can be hard as hell to find just a regular cup of brewed coffee. 

The world in six cups 
"It plays a central role in both religious rituals and secular ceremonies. It has proven health benefits. It can promote either community and camaraderie or solitude and introspection. It can be calming or invigorating. Tea is arguably the most versatile beverage on Earth."
I once had a post about the world according to coffee. Well tea is a pretty good follow-up for those of us who enjoy global trekking and warm drinks.

The world in six cups

"It plays a central role in both religious rituals and secular ceremonies. It has proven health benefits. It can promote either community and camaraderie or solitude and introspection. It can be calming or invigorating. Tea is arguably the most versatile beverage on Earth."

I once had a post about the world according to coffee. Well tea is a pretty good follow-up for those of us who enjoy global trekking and warm drinks.

The only travel guide I need…
A Caffeine Addicts Guide to the World 

Choosing a cup of coffee is about more than just milk or sugar. From the Ethiopian countryside where coffee was first discovered to the baroque cafes of imperial Europe to the high-tech streets of Tokyo, coffee has adapted to almost every culture — even infiltrating tea-loving strongholds such as India and Hong Kong. Here’s your global guide to regional coffee styles: some that have caught on across the globe, some that represent a special link to the area — and some that are just plain weird.

The only travel guide I need…

A Caffeine Addicts Guide to the World 

Choosing a cup of coffee is about more than just milk or sugar. From the Ethiopian countryside where coffee was first discovered to the baroque cafes of imperial Europe to the high-tech streets of Tokyo, coffee has adapted to almost every culture — even infiltrating tea-loving strongholds such as India and Hong Kong. Here’s your global guide to regional coffee styles: some that have caught on across the globe, some that represent a special link to the area — and some that are just plain weird.

csmonitor
I was hoping to finally have a chance to use it…unfortunate.
csmonitor:

shortformblog:

Goodbye, Jonathan’s Card: After a day in which a cool experiment got co-opted by some jerk, Starbucks shut the social experiment down. The worst part? Apparently, Sam Odio’s brother Daniel Odio was shoving money onto the card. And he owns a startup, too. In other words, two dudes decided to use something purely meant as a pay-it-forward act of kindness as a way to promote their startups. Lame. 

Clearly, Starbucks didn’t think about this fully. I would have hired the guy and had him lead our “Pay-it-forward” division — not disable his card!

I was hoping to finally have a chance to use it…unfortunate.

csmonitor:

shortformblog:

Goodbye, Jonathan’s Card: After a day in which a cool experiment got co-opted by some jerk, Starbucks shut the social experiment down. The worst part? Apparently, Sam Odio’s brother Daniel Odio was shoving money onto the card. And he owns a startup, too. In other words, two dudes decided to use something purely meant as a pay-it-forward act of kindness as a way to promote their startups. Lame. 

Clearly, Starbucks didn’t think about this fully. I would have hired the guy and had him lead our “Pay-it-forward” division — not disable his card!