A trial is scheduled to begin on Oct. 18, with Mr. Say facing up to 18 months in prison if convicted. 

Another Twitter post, this one written by Mr. Say, joked about a muezzin’s rapid delivery of the call to prayer, asking if he wanted to get away quickly for a drink. The messages are no longer available online. The pianist, who has frequently criticized the pro-Islamic Justice and Development Party government over its cultural and social policies, publicly defines himself as an atheist — a controversial admission in Turkey, which is overwhelmingly Muslim.
In his text message from Slovenia, Mr. Say said he was only one of 165 people who shared the Twitter post on the vision of Islamic paradise.
“I just thought it was a funny allegory and retweeted the message,” he said. “It is unbelievable that it was made into a court case.”
He continued, “This case, which goes against universal human rights and laws, is saddening not only when judged on its own merit but also for Turkey’s image.”
Many intellectuals and writers have faced similar charges in recent years, including Orhan Pamuk, the Nobel laureate, who last year was fined $3,700 for saying in a Swiss newspaper that Turks “have killed 30,000 Kurds and 1 million Armenians.”
The European Union, which Turkey is seeking to join, and other international organizations have criticized such actions as violations of free speech.
Mr. Say, who has served as a European Union culture ambassador, has a busy international career, with frequent engagements in Europe and to a lesser extent in Asia and the United States. He has performed with major orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Berlin Symphony Orchestra.

A trial is scheduled to begin on Oct. 18, with Mr. Say facing up to 18 months in prison if convicted.

Another Twitter post, this one written by Mr. Say, joked about a muezzin’s rapid delivery of the call to prayer, asking if he wanted to get away quickly for a drink. The messages are no longer available online. The pianist, who has frequently criticized the pro-Islamic Justice and Development Party government over its cultural and social policies, publicly defines himself as an atheist — a controversial admission in Turkey, which is overwhelmingly Muslim.

In his text message from Slovenia, Mr. Say said he was only one of 165 people who shared the Twitter post on the vision of Islamic paradise.

“I just thought it was a funny allegory and retweeted the message,” he said. “It is unbelievable that it was made into a court case.”

He continued, “This case, which goes against universal human rights and laws, is saddening not only when judged on its own merit but also for Turkey’s image.”

Many intellectuals and writers have faced similar charges in recent years, including Orhan Pamuk, the Nobel laureate, who last year was fined $3,700 for saying in a Swiss newspaper that Turks “have killed 30,000 Kurds and 1 million Armenians.”

The European Union, which Turkey is seeking to join, and other international organizations have criticized such actions as violations of free speech.

Mr. Say, who has served as a European Union culture ambassador, has a busy international career, with frequent engagements in Europe and to a lesser extent in Asia and the United States. He has performed with major orchestras, including the New York Philharmonic and the Berlin Symphony Orchestra.

thesmithian

Uh, can we please talk about the drug cartel in this? If anyone is making people piss their pants scared to use social media, it’s the cartel. It’s one thing for a terrorist organization to have an account to promote their ideals, it’s another thing to kill people for holding accounts or even sending one-time messages against their ideals.

However, this particular article on the Shabab network in Somalia is still fascinating. Though they’re obviously trying to promote themselves in a more polished manner, this could also mean people in the Western world can start conversations directly with insiders to the Shabab via Twitter. Instead of promotion, it could more likely backfire on the terrorist group.

globalvoices

Nobel Peace Prize for Arab Revolution Netizens?

globalvoices:

Twitter is abuzz with excitement as the names of Arab netizens are being circulated as possible candidates for the Nobel Peace Prize for the roles they have played in the Arab revolutions.

Read more

pantslessprogressive
futurejournalismproject:

“This will happen to all the Internet snitches.”
The bodies of a man and a woman hang from a bridge in Neuvo Laredo, a city along the US-Mexico border. The two were allegedly killed by drug cartel members for reporting information about drug violence to Mexican Web sites that aggregate such data.
The quote above is from a sign found near the two.
Via a September 15 New York Times post in the Lede Blog:

The murders were all the more disturbing because, absent regular news reports on the drug violence, many in Mexico turn to Twitter and other social media for information. Hashtags — which tie Twitter posts together — have become an important sorting mechanism, turning connected reports by individual Twitter accounts into an ad hoc news service.

And from today’s New York Times:

The killings highlighted the growing power of the so-called cyber guardians, whose Twitter accounts sometimes carry avatars depicting Pancho Villa and other heroes of the Mexican Revolution. The drug cartels, which have often successfully enforced information blackouts at the local level by intimidating the police and reporters, are clearly threatened by the decentralized distribution of the Web. And it may be harder for them to control.

Today’s Times story begins with Mexican Twitter users alerting one another to stay away from a particular street in Veracruz. Masked gunmen were in the process of dumping 35 bodies under a bridge.
Image Source: Borderland Beat.

futurejournalismproject:

This will happen to all the Internet snitches.

The bodies of a man and a woman hang from a bridge in Neuvo Laredo, a city along the US-Mexico border. The two were allegedly killed by drug cartel members for reporting information about drug violence to Mexican Web sites that aggregate such data.

The quote above is from a sign found near the two.

Via a September 15 New York Times post in the Lede Blog:

The murders were all the more disturbing because, absent regular news reports on the drug violence, many in Mexico turn to Twitter and other social media for information. Hashtags — which tie Twitter posts together — have become an important sorting mechanism, turning connected reports by individual Twitter accounts into an ad hoc news service.

And from today’s New York Times:

The killings highlighted the growing power of the so-called cyber guardians, whose Twitter accounts sometimes carry avatars depicting Pancho Villa and other heroes of the Mexican Revolution. The drug cartels, which have often successfully enforced information blackouts at the local level by intimidating the police and reporters, are clearly threatened by the decentralized distribution of the Web. And it may be harder for them to control.

Today’s Times story begins with Mexican Twitter users alerting one another to stay away from a particular street in Veracruz. Masked gunmen were in the process of dumping 35 bodies under a bridge.

Image Source: Borderland Beat.